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Multi-Threading Is Not Always The Right Answer. Here Is Why!

Dr. Ashish Bamania 86

Modern software engineering is all about making applications efficient.

Concurrency is thus a critical aspect as modern applications perform multiple tasks simultaneously and maximize hardware utilization.

Let’s learn this better with an example.

We are opening up a small coffee shop and we build a mobile app through which users can place coffee orders online.

Let’s write a simple server that handles these order requests.

from socket import socket, create_server

BUFFER_SIZE = 1024
ADDRESS = ("127.0.0.1", 12345)

class CoffeeServer:
def __init__(self):
try:
self.server_socket = create_server(ADDRESS)
print("Coffee server started at:", ADDRESS)
except OSError:
print("\nCoffee server stopped.")

def accept(self):
conn, client_address = self.server_socket.accept()
print("Connected to a coffee lover at:", client_address)
return conn

def serve(self, conn):
try:
while True:
order = conn.recv(BUFFER_SIZE).decode().strip()
if not order:
break
response = self.process_order(order)
conn.send(response.encode())
finally:
print("Connection with", conn.getpeername(), "closed")
conn.close()

def process_order(self, order):
menu = {
"1": "Your espresso is on its way!",
"2": "Enjoy your latte!",
"3": "Your cappuccino is coming right up!",
}
return menu.get(order, "Sorry, we don't have that option.")

def start(self):
print("Coffee server is ready to take orders")
try:
while True:
conn = self.accept()
self.serve(conn)
finally:
self.server_socket.close()
print("\nCoffee server stopped.")

if __name__ == "__main__":
coffee_server = CoffeeServer()
coffee_server.start()

In the above, we set up a coffee server that uses sockets to communicate with users over the network. Users can connect to the server, send coffee orders, and receive corresponding responses.